Posts tagged #dream job

How To Juggle More Than One Job

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In today’s evolving workforce, it’s common to have a more than one job. Maybe a full-time job and a “side hustle,” or perhaps a full-time schedule that is made up of several side jobs. Does this describe your work life?

This multi-job work situation is especially common when changing career paths. Experience gained from a side job can help you transition to a different career path. But you have to be able to balance the extra work and sometimes conflicting schedule for it to really be worth it.

If you’re juggling more than one job or thinking about it, here are some tips to stay on track.

1. Be Organized

This is the single most important aspect when juggling more than one job. Staying organized with different projects and various due dates is crucial to delivering great work and maintaining peace of mind. Find an organization method that works best for you – whether that be a spreadsheet, calendar reminders, or writing things down. Keep your work and deadlines in one place that you can see and reference every day. That way, deadlines won’t creep up on you!

2. Master Your Schedule

It can be easy to feel overwhelmed when juggling different deliverables and timelines. By setting and mastering your schedule, you can block off time dedicated for certain projects. Another aspect of mastering your schedule is planning your schedule ahead of time. Take time to write down major task due dates and then make sub-tasks and mini due dates to hit the big ones. This will help to prioritize your schedule and give you pockets of free time where you can relax or consider taking on more work.

3. Know Your Limits

Make sure you don’t commit to more than you can deliver. Know your time limitations and be upfront about this to yourself and your employer. You don’t want your jobs to be so time-consuming that you don’t give yourself time to breathe. Establish the time commitment you can take on and stick to it. Once you master your schedule and find extra pockets of time, then you can take on more, if you choose.

4. Give Yourself Time To Rest

Resting and recharging is vital to success. Juggling different jobs isn’t easy. You need to give yourself time away from the desk to mentally and physically rest and recharge. Try to give yourself a day off each week. If your workload is too heavy, make the most of your free hours. Bake cookies, take a yoga class, or walk around the block, whatever de-stresses you. By giving yourself these outlets away from work, you’ll be able to return to your responsibilities fresh and motivated.

Are you interested in exploring different career paths? We can help you create an action plan for the career of your dreams.


Posted on October 23, 2018 and filed under Career.

What’s The Difference Between Agency, Corporate, And Contract?

When you first enter the workforce after graduation, it’s difficult to know what type of work environment will best serve your working style and cultivate professional growth towards achieving your career goals. You might not even know what your career goals are, let alone how to pursue them.

Will you thrive in a corporate environment, or are you better suited for agency life?

Or perhaps you’d be better off doing contract work given your entrepreneurial aspirations?

Where do you want to be in 5 years? Management? Own your own business? Leading your own projects?

These self-reflection questions are important to finding a position that you enjoy and will be an intentional step in your career path. But how do you answer these questions if you don’t know where you want your path to lead? The absolute best way to explore different work environments is to intern at a variety of places within your field. To help you get started, here’s a brief overview of the similarities and differences between agency, corporate, and contract work.

Agency

An agency is typically business-to-business (known as B2B) and is not directly customer facing. Agencies are small with anywhere from 25 to a couple hundred employees and are often privately-owned by a family or a small group of investors. Despite their size, they are full service and require a wide variety of positions - human resources, accounting, graphic design, information technology, communications, sales, etc. Agencies often have many different clients and have designated teams that serve each client.

Advertising and marketing agencies are common types of agencies. They don’t serve customers directly, but are hired by other businesses to manage and create their advertising and marketing needs. For example, a large automotive manufacturing company (corporate) will hire an agency to manage all of its advertisements, a different agency to create it’s training for employees, and yet another agency to handle all employee travel.

Corporate

The corporate world is maybe a little more familiar, as it’s often portrayed in movies and TV shows like “The Office.” Ultimately, a corporation is a large group that can legally act as a single entity. They typically have one goal - to sell its good or service. Gas and electric companies, TV broadcasting networks, and regional and national retail stores are just a few examples of corporations. Governments are structured similarly to corporations, although their processes, income stream, and legal rights are much different.

As mentioned in the agency section, corporations hire agencies to conduct work they feel are “experts’ in an area. Let’s use the automotive manufacturer example again. The goal for that company is to sell cars. They will hire a marketing agency to develop their marketing campaigns because the agency is the expert in marketing, not the automotive company. The marketing agency will produce better marketing materials for the corporate team than they could ever do themselves. It’s just not their expertise.

Contract

Contract work can be found in both agency and corporate environments, but also in work-from-home situations. If you are looking to work part-time or in a temporary position while you determine the best place for you, contract work is a great option.

The situation will be different at every company, and there are pros and cons with each arrangement.

The pros: it’s flexible yet steady income as long as you are in contract. It builds your resume and can be a great way to get your foot in the door. Many contract positions are contract-to-hire, which means if they like you and you do great work, they will extend a full-time offer.

The cons: you may not be eligible to draw benefits or have taxes withheld. And once your contract is done, you’ll be on the job hunt again.

Need help determining where you fit best? We would love to partner with you to craft a tailored career plan that maximizes your potential. Contact us today to set up a consultation!

 

Posted on December 6, 2017 and filed under Career.

Why Don’t You Like Your Job?

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It’s not really work if you love what you do.

This phrase is said by the “luckiest” among us, who have a passion for their work and are content and happy in their profession. If this isn’t you...what if you found out that it isn’t luck that makes these people happy at work...it’s strategy.  

Dig Deep To Figure Out What You Love & What You Don’t

Spend time figuring out what it is about your current job that you don’t like. Don’t leave anything out - you are only holding yourself back if you aren’t honest with yourself. You need to also figure out what it is that you love about your job (or would love in a job).

Here are some reflection questions that will give your think-session a jump start:

  • What specific things make me dread going to work every day?

  • What do I do at work that makes me upset or angry?

  • What do I find really boring about my job?

  • Are the things I dislike correlated in some way? Are they are relational issues? Task-oriented? Related to workplace culture?

  • What do I like about my current job?

  • What would I like in a job that I’m currently not doing/receiving?

Put Together A Strategy

Once you have a good idea of the specific likes/dislikes of your job, it’s time to put together a strategy. You CAN find and secure a job that you love with a little motivation and effort.

Here are a few things to consider as you are putting together a strategy to find a great job:

  • Brainstorm a list of jobs with descriptions that leave out as many dislikes and include as many likes that you came up with in the above activity. Google is a good tool here - do some research!

  • Do you have the skills and experience to secure one of these positions? If not, make a plan to gain the requirements. If you are completely switching career fields, you may need more school, training, to learn a new skill, start volunteering, etc. Is the investment worth it to have a job that you love? (We say YES!)

  • Start networking in the industry or with specific people/companies that fit with what you are looking for.

  • Find a mentor that can provide trustworthy tips and advice in the field. There is nothing more valuable than wisdom from those who have gone before you!

Find Your Dream Job

Once you’ve done all of the above, finding your dream job is only a matter of time. You can get your dream job as long as you are willing to put in the work to get it.

If this seems daunting, we’d love to help you sort through it all. We offer career coaching services that will put you on the path to successfully landing your dream job!

Posted on November 8, 2017 and filed under Career, Search Strategy.